Airports plan social media spending boost [INFOGRAPHIC]

Following on from its studies into airlines’ social media activity, Simpliflying has produced some research on airports and their plans for investment in the channel.

The bottom line is that about 40% of airports say they plan to invest more in social media eventhough the majority say they are unsure of its impact.

Other key findings include:

  • more than 55% of airports currently invest fewer than 100 man-hours per month in social media
  • roughly 63%  invest less than $10,000 in social media annually
  • social budgets range from a few $1,000 to $100,000
  • 60% cite insufficient resources for social media as the biggest challenge

Simpliflying surveyed 55 airports for the Airport Social Media Outlook 2012 study.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail to someone
 
 

About the Writer :: Linda Fox

Linda worked at tnooz from September 2011 to June 2018 in roles including senior reporter, deputy editor and managing editor.

 

Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Victor White

    An airport is only a captive environment once the passenger/customer gets into the door of the terminal. Many airports, like us in Wichita, have to compete with other regional airports for airline passenger business. Therefore, we invest heavily in all forms of social media at Mid-Continent Airport so that we can better and quickly inform our customers of service offerings, fare sales, facility upgrades and construction impacts, etc. We also use social to create and enhance our brand awareness and build an affinity by connecting with our customers. We also help market and reward customer loyalty by providing free products to passengers who check- into the terminal by using Four Square.

     
  2. Elizabeth (@SimpliElizabeth)

    You both make interesting points, Michael and Linda. While airports are in fact a very captive environment, what we are learning is that before social media, airports were not able to easily interact and create relationships with passengers, as those flying through are technically the passengers of the airline tenants, and not the airport. With the introduction of social media in airports, the airport is now able to begin to build relationships with passengers and enhance customer service.

    Your question on an airport’s financial gain from Social Media is one that is still fully taking shape but I would like to share a few examples of ways in which airports can utilize social media, all which in turn either directly or indirectly generate financial returns:

    1. Use of location-based tools to enhance non-aeronautical revenues: http://j.mp/V79mom
    2. Use of social media for increased relationship building with airline partners: http://j.mp/HLjnl6
    3. Use of social customer service and engaging the connected traveler: http://j.mp/T0un6E

    Our team would be happy to have a more in depth conversation with you on the use of social media in airports and how many airports are engaging passengers profitably. You can reach us directly at airports@SimpliFlying.com. In the meantime, please feel free to check on the recent Top 10 on airports: http://j.mp/Top10Airports2012 to see some of these practices in action.

     
    • Nick Vivion

      Nick Vivion

      Similar to the way that airlines started their loyalty program to learn about who their customers were (and be able to get permission to market to them) airports are likely looking to own the client relationship and become more of a personality – and become a destination unto themselves.

       
  3. michael j

    Why would a captive environment like an airport spend a cent on social media ?
    Please give me 3 examples of financial gain, that can help to remove my total skepticism.

    I’m a social media user myself, so I’m hardly luddite, but here I dont see the rational

     
    • Linda Fox

      Interesting point Michael, guess it will be more about customer engagement but also maybe about discovering services they could provide, that people would pay for, like speeding passengers through the airport or giving families a helping hand

       
    • Nick Vivion

      Nick Vivion

      Here are three areas that I think airports could make money/add value to their tenants and travelers, and thus make money in increased rents for both gates and shop space:

      1) Provide geo-located deals to restaurants and other venues to travelers
      2) Provide a go-to location for travelers looking for more airport information outside of apps like GateGuru (say a tab on Facebook page)
      3) News and information about the location that people are traveling through in order to encourage those staying in the area to frequent local businesses – similar to the USPS Moving Pack with coupons, but for those who just landed.

      Granted, these aren’t all direct money-making schemes. However, for the discerning traveler that picks departure and transit airports according to amenities, there can be a sizable advantage to an airport that does a stellar job at sharing amenities with both the outside world and the captive in-airport audience.

       
 
 

Newsletter Subscription

Please subscribe now to Tnooz’s FREE daily newsletter.

This lively package of news and information from Tnooz’s web site provides a convenient digest of what’s happening in technology that drives the global travel, tourism and hospitality market.

  • Cancel